ISCAS 2013

Circuits & Systems Society Forum on Emerging & Selected Topics (CAS-FEST)

09:00-16:50, Sunday, May 19 2013

Room: 305

The 2013 Circuits and Systems Society Forum on Emerging and Selected Topics (CAS-FEST) event will be the fourth event in the series organized by IEEE CAS Society and will be held on May 19th, 2013, in conjunction with ISCAS 2013, Beijing, China. The goal of this forum is to bring an emerging topic for researchers to exchange state-of-the-art development and future ideas together. Previous CAS-FEST topics include variation-aware design for nano-scale VLSI, brain machine interfaces, and heterogeneous nano circuits and systems. The 2013 CAS-FEST aims to provide a timely discussion on "Low-Power, Intelligent, and Secure Solutions for Realization of Internet of Things."

Rapid advancement of networking technologies together with extreme miniaturization of computing and communication devices enable emerging and exciting applications and services that connect the cyber and physical worlds. In the future, digital sensing, communication, and processing capabilities will be ubiquitously embedded into everyday objects, turning them into the Internet of Things (IoT). In this new paradigm, smart devices will collect data, relay the information or context to each other, and process the information collaboratively in a machine-to-machine manner.

This paradigm shift creates numerous challenges and opportunities for engineering. For example, in the future, enormous numbers of sensors will be deployed. It is often incredibly expensive to replace sensor batteries once they are in the field. Therefore, one major challenge is to design low power sensor that require no battery change. This creates a demand for energy-efficient designs and energy harvesting, including low-power circuits and communication protocols.

Connected devices can produce oceans of data. We need layers of intelligence to transform this data into wisdom. In this new computing era, analysis of data and its context will play a key role. Furthermore, not all the data are important or useful. Architecture-wise, it is natural for sensor data to be processed in a hierarchical and distributed fashion. Data may be analyzed and fused in sensors or gateways before arriving at the data center to save energy and bandwidth. If the system can recognize what context is important in the very beginning, it only needs to transmit the relevant information to the backend server or the cloud. As devices become more computationally capable, intelligent computation may easily be distributed among the sensors and the backend servers.

None of us likes to expose our personal or confidential information to the public. We also don't want people to provide false information that changes the proper action of the system. Therefore, another challenge on this topic is data security and privacy. While always being a major concern, data security and privacy is even more important in IoT, which touches many aspects of human life. Some low-cost devices have a limited budget to implement strong security or cryptography features. These lightweight devices can become the weakest links in the system. If the lightweight devices are not properly secured, the data they produce cannot be fully trusted.

In order to deploy end-to-end solutions for intelligent/secure interaction among connected devices, IoT requires research from multiple disciplines. In this CAS-FEST, we bring the following top experts (in the alphabetic order) to provide overview on low-power, intelligent, and secure solutions for realization of IoT.

Time

Title

Speakers

9:00-9:10

Opening

9:10-10:30

Challenges and Opportunities in the Internet of Things

Lionel M. Ni (IEEE Fellow), Chair Professor and Dean of Fok Ying Tung Graduate School, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, CHINA

10:30-10:40

Tea Break

10:40-11:30

Can Telecomm Networks Support IoT?

Yu-Chee Tseng (IEEE Fellow), Chair Professor and Dean of College of Computer Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu, TAIWAN

11:30-12:20

Planet-Scale Sensing: from lab to the real world

Dr. Feng Zhao (IEEE Fellow), Assistant Managing Director, Microsoft Research Asia, Beijing, CHINA

12:20-13:30

Lunch Break

13:30-14:20

Improving Lifestyle and Personal Health Using Wearable Devices and Network Resources

Mingui Sun (IEEE CAS Distinguished Lecturer), Professor of Neurological Surgery, Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

14:20-14:30

Tea Break

14:30-15:50

Internet of Things - What and How

Wei Zhao (IEEE Fellow), Rector and Chair Professor, University of Macau, Macau, CHINA

15:50-16:40

Building Trusted Infrastructure for IoT

Gang Qu, Associate Professor of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

16:40-16:50

Closing comments

CAS-FEST is different from the regular sessions. We add significant amount of Q&A and discussion time per session (around 40%). We hope this forum will provide an opportunity for CAS researchers to exchange ideas on this emerging topic.

Organizers

Yen-Kuang Chen, Intel Corporation (yen-kuang.chen@intel.com)
Magdy A. Bayoumi, University of Louisiana at Lafayette (mab@cacs.louisiana.edu)
Farinaz Koushanfar, Rice University (farinaz@rice.edu)

 

9:10-10:30 a.m. 

Challenges and Opportunities in the Internet of Things

Lionel M. Ni (IEEE Fellow), Chair Professor and Dean of Fok Ying Tung Graduate School, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, CHINA

The concept of Internet of Things (IoT), which allows the physical world to integrate with the digital world, has drawn significant attention from government, industry and academia. But in the end many people do not know exactly what is IoT. Many government officials want to build "smart cities", but what is the relationship between smart cities and IoT? I will use practical examples, such as smart transportation, smart healthcare, and smart video surveillance, to illustrate the economic opportunities in the IoT. I will also address some core technologies and technical challenges underlining IoT.

Biography

Lionel M. Ni is Chair Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). He also serves as the Dean of HKUST Fok Ying Tung Graduate School and Special Assistant to the President of HKUST. A fellow of IEEE and Hong Kong Academy of Engineering Sciences, Dr. Ni has chaired over 30 professional conferences, delivered over 30 keynote speeches, produced over 40 Ph.D. students, won six best paper awards, and published three books. According to Google scholar, his research papers, covering high performance computing, high speed networking, distributed systems, mobile computing, and pervasive computing, have been cited for over 16,000 times and his H-index is 58.

 

10:40-11:30 a.m. 

Can Telecomm Networks Support IoT?

Yu-Chee Tseng (IEEE Fellow), Chair Professor and Dean of College of Computer Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu, TAIWAN

Internet-of-Things (IoT) has attracted a lot of interests recently. Many tools and standards are being developed. Managing objects in an IoT environment is not an easy job. One question is: “Can we use telecomm networks to support IoT applications?” This would involve many issues, such as standardization, charging, interoperatability, etc. In this talk, I will try to address this issues by defining what IoT is, pointing out the advantages of using telecomm for IoT, discussing the QoS definition in LTE-A, and connecting the power-saving support in LTE-A for IoT. I hope that this talk will trigger more discussions about using 3GPP LTE-A to support IoT services.

Biography

2 Yu-Chee Tseng got his Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science from the Ohio State University in January of 1994. He was/is Chairman (2005-2009), Chair Professor (2011-present), and Dean (2011-present), College of Computer Science, National Chiao-Tung University, Taiwan.

Dr. Tseng is a Y. Z. Hsu Scientific Chair Professor. Dr. Tseng received Outstanding Research Award (National Science Council, 2001, 2003, and 2009), Best Paper Award (Int’l Conf. on Parallel Processing, 2003), Elite I. T. Award (2004), and Distinguished Alumnus Award (Ohio State University, 2005), and Y. Z. Hsu Scientific Paper Award (2009). His research interests include mobile computing, wireless communication, and sensor networks. Dr. Tseng is an IEEE Fellow. He serves/served on the editorial boards of IEEE Trans. on Vehicular Technology (2005-2009), IEEE Trans. on Mobile Computing (2006-2011), and IEEE Trans. on Parallel and Distributed Systems (2008-present).

 

11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.

Planet-Scale Sensing: from lab to the real world

Feng Zhao, Microsoft Research Asia

The lofty vision of the wireless sensor network research, when it started more than a decade ago, was to blanket the planet with tiny, self-organizing smart dust. Each dust particle has a little bit of sensing, computation and communication, with some onboard energy reserve. When released in the ambience, the smart dust collaborates to sense and possibly act on the physical world and its inhabitants, for a variety of societal scale problems such as environment, energy, health, and mobility. Now, with the advent of the increasingly more capable sensors on widely available platforms such as cell phones and vehicles, the age of planet-scale sensor networks has finally arrived. This new generation mobile sensing systems leverage storage and processing on both mobile devices and in the cloud. Furthermore, the ability to crowd-source the sensing and action with users in the loop presents new opportunities as well as raising issues of privacy and security. In this talk, I will give an overview of the major advances in sensor networks to date. The rest of the talk will cover mobile sensing, including sensing a person’s physiological state, mapping out noise in the environment, and understanding human mobility patterns for better urban planning.

Biography

http://www.ucalgary.ca/icic/files/icic/images/feng_zhao.jpg Dr. Zhao is an Assistant Managing Director at Microsoft Research Asia, responsible for the hardware, mobile and sensing, software analytics, systems and networking research areas. His own research has focused on wireless sensor networks, energy-efficient computing, and mobile systems. Prior to joining MSR-Asia in 2009, he was a Principal Researcher at MSR Redmond (2004-2009), and founded the Networked Embedded Computing Group that has designed and deployed sensor networks at several Microsoft datacenters for environmental monitoring and energy optimization. He was a Principal Scientist at Xerox PARC 1997-2004, and founded PARC’s sensor network effort.

Dr. Zhao has championed the wireless sensor network and energy-efficient computing research in the past two decades. He was among the first to develop a suite of collaborative sensing and processing protocols for tracking problems using networked sensors, including the IDSQ algorithm. He authored or co-authored over 100 technical papers and books, including a book, Wireless Sensor Networks: An information processing approach, by Morgan Kaufmann. He was the founding Editor-In-Chief of ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks (2003-2010), and founded the ACM/IEEE IPSN conference. In 2008, he helped start a new workshop, HotPower, focusing on the emerging topic of sustainable computing.

Dr.Zhao received a PhD in Computer Science from MIT, and a BS from Shanghai Jiaotong University. He taught at Ohio State University and Stanford University. An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Zhao received a Sloan Research Fellowship (1994) and NSF and ONR Young Investigator Awards (1994, 1997). His work has been featured in news media such as BBC World News, BusinessWeek, and Technology Review.

 

13:30-14:20 p.m.

Improving Lifestyle and Personal Health Using Wearable Devices and Network Resources

Mingui Sun (IEEE CAS Distinguished Lecturer), Professor of Neurological Surgery, Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Lifestyle, including diet, physical activity, living environment, stress, social interaction, etc., plays an essential role in human health. In recent years, unhealthy lifestyle, such as overeating and inactivity, has been adopted by an increasing portion of the world population and led to a steady rise of chronic diseases, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, lung disease, diabetes, etc. One promising solution to this important problem is to provide healthcare professionals with new tools to study people’s daily lives and improving their lifestyle. In recent years, smartphones, wearable devices and cloud computing platforms have allowed the developments of these tools for use at people’s homes or community clinics. This presentation provides an overview of our research in this emerging field, including the development of a wearable computer to evaluate diet, physical activity, living environment, and lifestyle. We will also present an integrated wearable system consisting of a smart phone, a wearable computer, a wristband, and a wireless link for monitoring and assisting children, elderly, and visually impaired people.

Biography

http://www.popcitymedia.com/galleries/innovation/issue278/ebuttons_600.jpg Mingui Sun received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from University of Pittsburgh in 1989 and joined the faculty at the same university in 1991, where he is currently a Professor of neurosurgery, electrical engineering, and bioengineering. His recent research interests include bioelectronics, biosignal and image processing, electrophysiology, neuroengineering, radio-frequency systems for medical applications, and wearable systems for the study of diet, physical activity, lifestyle, and exposure biology. He has published over 350 papers in journals, conferences and book chapters. His research has been supported by NIH and other U.S. federal agencies. He is a member of the IEEE BioCAS technical committee, and a member of the “1000 Talents” in China.

 

 

14:30-15:50 p.m. 

Internet of Things - What and How

Wei Zhao (IEEE Fellow), Rector and Chair Professor, University of Macau, Macau, CHINA

Internet of Things (IoT) is a networking infrastructure for cyber-physical systems. With IoT, physical objects should be seamlessly integrated into an Internet-like system so that the physical objects and cyber-agents can interact each other in order to achieve mission-critical objectives. Internet of Things (IoT) should have tremendous application potential and hence has become popular in recent years, attracting great attentions from both academic research and industrial development. In this talk, we will first focus on fundamental issues related to IoT. We address principles that should guide research and development of IoT. We will then present several approaches that may lead to implementation of IoT and analyze their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we will discuss critical issues that must be addressed in order to fully realize the objectives and potentials of IoT.

Biography

Wei Zhao is currently the Rector of the University of Macau (UM). Before joining the University of Macau, Professor Zhao served as the Dean of the School of Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Director for the Division of Computer and Network Systems in the U.S. National Science Foundation, and Senior Associate Vice President for Research at Texas A&M University.

As an IEEE Fellow and an Academician of, Professor Zhao has made significant contributions in distributed computing, real-time systems, computer networks, and cyberspace security. His research group has been well recognized and received numerous awards and prizes including the outstanding paper award (1992) from the IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems, the best paper award (1998) from the IEEE National Aerospace and Electronics Conference, an award on technology transfer from the Defense Advanced Research Program Agency in 2002, and the best paper award (2008) from the IEEE International Communication Conference. In 2007, he received the IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems Outstanding Achievement Award. Professor Zhao is the holder of two U.S. patents and has published over 300 papers in journals, conferences, and book chapters. In 2011, he was named by the Ministry of Science and Technology as the Chief Scientist of the national 973 Internet of Things Project on cyber-physical networking systems. Recognizing his accomplishments in education leadership and scientific research, Wei Zhao has been a recipient of 12 Honoral doctoral degrees.

 

15:50-16:40 p.m. 

Building Trusted Infrastructure for IoT

Gang Qu, Associate Professor of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA

Internet of Things (IoT) has become a popular infrastructure for information gathering and decision making. Security and trust are of vital importance in building IoT. As security threats may come from all components, we believe that a holistic approach is needed to establish trust from all layers of the network and through all phases of the IoT design. In this talk, we focus on building trusted in two critical components of IoT: circuitry and routing protocols.

We start with hardware and show its security vulnerabilities, particularly when the circuit is designed and fabricated by untrusted parties. We describe a simple and effective attack to break the system and discuss the challenges to make hardware trustworthy. Then we introduce some recent works on how hardware can help to provide security and trust. Second, we consider the problem of insider attacks in the network routing layer and the current trust-based mechanisms developed to detect inside attackers. We analyze the limitations of these mechanisms and the potential research directions to enhance their detection accuracy and effectiveness. 

Biography

photoGang Qu is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the co-director of the embedded system research lab and the wireless sensor lab. His current research interests are on VLSI design automation and wireless sensor networks, with special focus on security and energy efficiency. He has published more than 100 journal articles and conference papers in these fields with best paper awards in MobiCom (2001) and ASAP (2006). Dr. Qu is currently on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Computers, IEEE Embedded Systems Letters, and Integration, the VLSI Journal.